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5 Ways For Field Service Management To Create A Customer-Centric Workplace

customer-centric-field-service-management | Photo Coursey of Depositphotos http://depositphotos.com/7875665/stock-photo-Couple-greeting-advisor.html?sqc=104&sqm=776&sq=1kocw5How customer-focused are you? Customer centricity needs to be a top field service management strategy.

An article on the Service Council website says service executives set the tone for customer-centricity. That strategy was the second in five key takeaways the Service Council concluded from the 2013 Smarter Services Symposium.

The article says service leaders must make it a priority to “create an environment where their service team members, and more, [can] be successful in satisfying the needs of their customers.”

Field service management needs to make sure from a leadership perspective that its actions support the standards it sets forth for the service team. It’s really detrimental when organizations have policies and guidelines for frontline people to support great customer service, but when it comes to key decisions, the leadership demonstrates the opposite. Leadership must support the culture and service standards that it’s trying to build in the organization.

The key is to engage service from the start when onboarding employees. Don’t focus so much on the technical skills that you forget about “soft skills” training. That’s critical to ensuring that service leaders continue to raise the bar. Make them feel empowered to make the right decisions on behalf of customers. Building an ownership culture is important. In other words, if this were their business, what would they decide for this customer?

Here are five key ways that leaders can create a service-oriented culture, according to the Service Council article.

  1. Share the positive and negative financial results of service work.
  2. Let your employees solve tough business challenges, like cutting costs or improving repair procedures.
  3. Recognize great work in person or over the phone.
  4. Use hiring and training to build your ideal service-oriented workforce.
  5. Listen to and implement employee feedback.

Finally, management should spend some time out in the field with service leaders — a “day in the life,” so to speak. It’s a great way to work together as a team and talk through the process of building better customer relationships. Making that time investment can really pay off and help field service organizations become more customer-centric.

Contributor: Julie West, president/COO at WennSoft

Source: The Service Council, May 2013

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